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civic engagement, social justice, diversity and inclusion, intersectionality, publicly engaged


Dr. Holly E. Harriel

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civic engagement, social justice, diversity and inclusion, intersectionality, publicly engaged


Dr. Holly E. Harriel

 

BIO

Dr. Holly E. Harriel is an independent consultant working on university-community partnerships, anchor institutions, civic engagement competencies and urban community transformation. Prior to her consultancy work, Harriel was the director of education outreach at Brown University. She received her Ed.D. in higher education management from the University of Pennsylvania, holds a masters degree in city planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is an alumnus of Auburn and Tuskegee Universities.   Holly's work is greatly informed from over 20 years of experience working with a wide range of stakeholder groups; as a senior leader at two community development corporations, a cross-sector collaborative neighborhood development non-profit, and a national community economic development funding agency.   Holly's passion for social justice has been the driving force in her career as an urban planner and educator.

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publicly engaged


Publicly

Engaged

publicly engaged


Publicly

Engaged

 
 

FOCUS AREAS

HISTORICAL MISTRUST:

How do institutions and communities alike, deal with the historical mistrust that so often exist while building reciprocal university-community partnerships that are sustainable?

DIVERSE CHANGE-MAKERS:

How is the shift of leadership in cities from Boomer generation civic leaders to urban Millennial change-makers influencing university-community partnerships?

CORE COMPETENCIES:

What professional development training should be created to assist campus leaders understand and build their individual, as well as, a campuss institutional capacity to work with urban change-makers in real time?

 
In my work I measure our group’s progress not by the simple answers that we discover, but by the hard questions we raise and our ability to sit with the uncomfortable answers we uncover.
— Holly Harriel